padmanabha swami temple treasure- Nithicharitham

Nithicharitham : A Flash Back (Part 1) by Uma Maheswary (pdf)
Nithicharitham : A Flash Back (Part 2) by Uma Maheswary (pdf)
Nithicharitham : A Flash Back (Part 3) by Uma Maheswary (pdf)
Hiranyagarfam & Dutch


Gold Coins(A) Gold Pagoda Early issue 1678-1740





(B) Arcot Gold Mohur

(C) Gold Pagoda 1808-1815AD series, ND

(D) Mohur 1819


(E) ½ Mohur, ND (1819), 5 Rupees, ND (1820) and ¼ Ashrafi, ND (1819)
(F) Double Pagoda, ND (AD 1809-1815) : 18 Stars type

(G) 5 Rupees, Gold, ND (AD 1820)

(H) Star Pagoda


(I) 3 Swami Pagoda


Travancore. 2 Pagodas, 1877.
(j) AIN Pagoda




Karimani Mala
Nagapada Thali - 2
Karimani Mala
Karimani Mala
Mullamottu Mala
Mullamottu Mala



Manga Mala - 1
Manga Mala - 1
Manga Mala - 2
Manga Mala - 2
Kazhuthila
Kazhuthila



Cheruthali
Cheruthali
Avilmala
Avilmala
Kandassaram
Kandassaram



Kingini
Kingini
Kuzhiminni
Kuzhiminni
Pulinakhamala
Pulinakhamala



Kumbilmala
Kumbilmala
Pathakkam

The monetary system used was:

golden fanam(panam)

    52 1/2 Fanam=1 Pagoda





NAPOLEON GOLD COINS IN THE TEMPLE
India. Travancore. Rama Varma IV gold Sovereign 1881 ME1057, K Travancore. Rama Varma IV gold Sovere

Travancore. Rama Varma IV gold Sovereign 1881 ME1057,


  • 536 kg of gold coins: 16 kg each of East India Company sovereigns and Travancore gold coins, 106 kg of Travancore Raasi coins and 3 kg of Napolean-era gold coins.
  • Three sets of crowns, including a centuries-old diamondand-emerald-studded golden crown, believed to be the crown of Kulasekhara Perumal.
  • Parts of a huge sacred drum made of pure gold,

  • Gold KashuMala Necklaces
  • in which the kings would bathe as part of Hiranya Garbham (coronation rituals).
  • An 18-ft Sarappoli golden chain, with 12 layers weighing 10.5 kg, studded with rare rubies and emeralds.
  • Over 1,000 Sarappoli chains and 2 kg of golden waist and wrist bands, and 100 kg of other gold chains and necklaces.
  • A Mahavishnu idol studded with over 1,000 diamonds and valued at over Rs 500 crore.
  • One tonne of paddy-shaped gold trinkets and numerous miniatures of golden elephants.
  • Belgian diamonds and rare Indraneelams (blue sapphires), emeralds and diamond-studded plates.
  • A golden broom weighing 5.5 kg, supposed to sweep flowers showered on the 18-ft gold-covered idol of Lord Padmanabha. Numerous golden coir ropes, one kg of golden human shapes and gold bars.
  • A 55-kg golden face mask and a golden idol of Lord Krishna weighing over 5 kg.
  • Day-to-day puja utensils in gold worth thousands of crores, including a huge golden hood, two golden lamps each weighing over 15 kg, a diamond-studded, golden thread and gold---plated-coconut shells to serve food to the GoD


Padmanabhaswamy temple Diamonds, Emeralds, Rubies,
Padmanabhaswamy Temple Diamonds, Emeralds, Rubies,





But it is difficult to value the treasure as some of it dates back to even 10th century. "It will require in-depth study to know the antiquity of the finds. Expert preservation techniques are needed to maintain them," says C.V. Anandabose, director general and vice-chancellor of the National Museum and University in New Delhi.

According to experts working with the Victoria Coins and Curios in Kochi, a 150-year-old, 8-gram rare Travancore gold coin is currently valued at more than Rs 1.5 lakh. The coins found so far at the temple weigh over 532 kg!

Regarding the treasure's public display, Anandabose says: "In the case of (the Hyderabad) Nizam's jewellery, a special Act was enacted. It is kept in the custody of the Reserve Bank of India and only a part of it is displayed occasionally at the galleries in Hyderabad and National Museum."

Roots Of Metals And StonesThe kingdom of Travancore dates back to the ancient Chera kings, who ruled Kerala with the title Kulasekhara Perumals for at least 10 centuries. With the motto of Dharmatha Kuladaivatham (Dharma is my family deity), the kings instituted high standards of governance.
ROYAL HERITAGE: Puri's Jagannath temple (right) and the ancient Somnath temple
The kings kept the state treasury separate from the temple treasury. Cash or gold taken from the temple treasury on rare occasions was returned promptly with proper documentation. Experts note that the royal family had kept secret documents on the inventory of most of the cellars, which were later codified as ‘Mathilakam Records' in the early 20th century by renowned Kerala poet Ulloor S. Parameswara Iyer.

The royal family also inherited considerable wealth from the last king Sree Chithirathirunal Bala Rama Varma. They also own many assets such as the export house Aspinwall Company in Kochi through various trusts.

The kings had large earnings from trade of spices with Europeans, especially black pepper known as ‘black gold', and much of this wealth was dedicated to Lord Padmanabhaswamy. Another source of revenue was offerings from defeated kings and from visitors. For example, in the 18th century, the defeated Kayamkulam king had to pay a sum of Rs 1,000 and an elephant to the temple. Then, the Travancore kings were mandated to conduct at least one Thulapurushadanam or Thulabharam — a sacred offering of  gold or precious items equal to one's weight — to Lord Padmanabhaswamy as part of coronation rituals.

Others In Line
Like the Sree Padmanabhaswamy temple, many other temples were run by royal families. These include the Puri Jagannath temple in Orissa, the Somnath temple at Veraval, Madurai Meenakshi, Kashi Viswanatha, Ujjain, Ekalingadi in Rajasthan, Kamakhya in Assam and the Bhimakali in Himachal Pradesh.Historically, many of these ancient temples stashed huge quantities of wealth and were a prime target for invaders. The ancient Somnath temple was plundered several times by emperors such as the Mahmud of Ghazni, Alauddin Khilji and Aurangzeb.

At present, the ancient Tirupathi Venkatachalapathi temple at Thirumala in Andhra Pradesh is estimated to have assets worth over   Rs 52,000 crore including a reserve of over five tonnes of gold and Rs 560 crore in fixed deposits. The annual revenue of the temple is estimated to be Rs 650 crore. Unofficial reports say the Shirdi Saibaba Temple at Shirdi in Maharashtra, run by the Shirdi Sai Trust, is estimated to receive Rs 350 crore worth donations every year; and the Shree Siddhivinayak Ganapati Temple in Mumbai gets donations worth more than Rs 50 crore every year. Puttaparthi Satya Sai Baba's religious empire is unofficially valued at $9 billion (Rs 40,000 crore). The Sabarimala Ayyappa temple in Kerala reported revenue of Rs 131 crore in 2010-11.
- See more at: http://www.businessworld.in/en/storypage/-/bw/divine-blessings/r318958.37490/page/0#sthash.ueNXa3Ey.dpuf
But it is difficult to value the treasure as some of it dates back to even 10th century. "It will require in-depth study to know the antiquity of the finds. Expert preservation techniques are needed to maintain them," says C.V. Anandabose, director general and vice-chancellor of the National Museum and University in New Delhi.

According to experts working with the Victoria Coins and Curios in Kochi, a 150-year-old, 8-gram rare Travancore gold coin is currently valued at more than Rs 1.5 lakh. The coins found so far at the temple weigh over 532 kg!

Regarding the treasure's public display, Anandabose says: "In the case of (the Hyderabad) Nizam's jewellery, a special Act was enacted. It is kept in the custody of the Reserve Bank of India and only a part of it is displayed occasionally at the galleries in Hyderabad and National Museum."

Roots Of Metals And StonesThe kingdom of Travancore dates back to the ancient Chera kings, who ruled Kerala with the title Kulasekhara Perumals for at least 10 centuries. With the motto of Dharmatha Kuladaivatham (Dharma is my family deity), the kings instituted high standards of governance.
ROYAL HERITAGE: Puri's Jagannath temple (right) and the ancient Somnath temple
The kings kept the state treasury separate from the temple treasury. Cash or gold taken from the temple treasury on rare occasions was returned promptly with proper documentation. Experts note that the royal family had kept secret documents on the inventory of most of the cellars, which were later codified as ‘Mathilakam Records' in the early 20th century by renowned Kerala poet Ulloor S. Parameswara Iyer.

The royal family also inherited considerable wealth from the last king Sree Chithirathirunal Bala Rama Varma. They also own many assets such as the export house Aspinwall Company in Kochi through various trusts.

The kings had large earnings from trade of spices with Europeans, especially black pepper known as ‘black gold', and much of this wealth was dedicated to Lord Padmanabhaswamy. Another source of revenue was offerings from defeated kings and from visitors. For example, in the 18th century, the defeated Kayamkulam king had to pay a sum of Rs 1,000 and an elephant to the temple. Then, the Travancore kings were mandated to conduct at least one Thulapurushadanam or Thulabharam — a sacred offering of  gold or precious items equal to one's weight — to Lord Padmanabhaswamy as part of coronation rituals.

Others In Line
Like the Sree Padmanabhaswamy temple, many other temples were run by royal families. These include the Puri Jagannath temple in Orissa, the Somnath temple at Veraval, Madurai Meenakshi, Kashi Viswanatha, Ujjain, Ekalingadi in Rajasthan, Kamakhya in Assam and the Bhimakali in Himachal Pradesh.Historically, many of these ancient temples stashed huge quantities of wealth and were a prime target for invaders. The ancient Somnath temple was plundered several times by emperors such as the Mahmud of Ghazni, Alauddin Khilji and Aurangzeb.

At present, the ancient Tirupathi Venkatachalapathi temple at Thirumala in Andhra Pradesh is estimated to have assets worth over   Rs 52,000 crore including a reserve of over five tonnes of gold and Rs 560 crore in fixed deposits. The annual revenue of the temple is estimated to be Rs 650 crore. Unofficial reports say the Shirdi Saibaba Temple at Shirdi in Maharashtra, run by the Shirdi Sai Trust, is estimated to receive Rs 350 crore worth donations every year; and the Shree Siddhivinayak Ganapati Temple in Mumbai gets donations worth more than Rs 50 crore every year. Puttaparthi Satya Sai Baba's religious empire is unofficially valued at $9 billion (Rs 40,000 crore). The Sabarimala Ayyappa temple in Kerala reported revenue of Rs 131 crore in 2010-11.
- See more at: http://www.businessworld.in/en/storypage/-/bw/divine-blessings/r318958.37490/page/0#sthash.ueNXa3Ey.dpuf
But it is difficult to value the treasure as some of it dates back to even 10th century. "It will require in-depth study to know the antiquity of the finds. Expert preservation techniques are needed to maintain them," says C.V. Anandabose, director general and vice-chancellor of the National Museum and University in New Delhi.

 According to experts working with the Victoria Coins and Curios in Kochi, a 150-year-old, 8-gram rare Travancore gold coin is currently valued at more than Rs 1.5 lakh. The coins found so far at the temple weigh over 532 kg!

 Regarding the treasure's public display, Anandabose says: "In the case of (the Hyderabad) Nizam's jewellery, a special Act was enacted. It is kept in the custody of the Reserve Bank of India and only a part of it is displayed occasionally at the galleries in Hyderabad and National Museum.

" Roots Of Metals And StonesThe kingdom of Travancore dates back to the ancient Chera kings, who ruled Kerala with the title Kulasekhara Perumals for at least 10 centuries.


With the motto of Dharmatha Kuladaivatham (Dharma is my family deity), the kings instituted high standards of governance.

 ROYAL HERITAGE: Puri's Jagannath temple (right) and the ancient Somnath temple The kings kept the state treasury separate from the temple treasury. Cash or gold taken from the temple treasury on rare occasions was returned promptly with proper documentation. Experts note that the royal family had kept secret documents on the inventory of most of the cellars, which were later codified as ‘Mathilakam Records' in the early 20th century by renowned Kerala poet Ulloor S. Parameswara Iyer.

 The royal family also inherited considerable wealth from the last king Sree Chithirathirunal Bala Rama Varma. They also own many assets such as the export house Aspinwall Company in Kochi through various trusts. The kings had large earnings from trade of spices with Europeans, especially black pepper known as ‘black gold', and much of this wealth was dedicated to Lord Padmanabhaswamy.


 Another source of revenue was offerings from defeated kings and from visitors. For example, in the 18th century, the defeated Kayamkulam king had to pay a sum of Rs 1,000 and an elephant to the temple.

 Then, the Travancore kings were mandated to conduct at least one Thulapurushadanam or Thulabharam — a sacred offering of gold or precious items equal to one's weight — to Lord Padmanabhaswamy as part of coronation rituals.

Others In Line Like the Sree Padmanabhaswamy temple, many other temples were run by royal families. These include the Puri Jagannath temple in Orissa, the Somnath temple at Veraval, Madurai Meenakshi, Kashi Viswanatha, Ujjain, Ekalingadi in Rajasthan, Kamakhya in Assam and the Bhimakali in Himachal Pradesh.

Historically, many of these ancient temples stashed huge quantities of wealth and were a prime target for invaders. The ancient Somnath temple was plundered several times by emperors such as the Mahmud of Ghazni, Alauddin Khilji and Aurangzeb.

 At present, the ancient Tirupathi Venkatachalapathi temple at Thirumala in Andhra Pradesh is estimated to have assets worth over Rs 52,000 crore including a reserve of over five tonnes of gold and Rs 560 crore in fixed deposits.

The annual revenue of the temple is estimated to be Rs 650 crore. Unofficial reports say the Shirdi Saibaba Temple at Shirdi in Maharashtra, run by the Shirdi Sai Trust, is estimated to receive Rs 350 crore worth donations every year; and the Shree Siddhivinayak Ganapati Temple in Mumbai gets donations worth more than Rs 50 crore every year. Puttaparthi Satya Sai Baba's religious empire is unofficially valued at $9 billion (Rs 40,000 crore). The Sabarimala Ayyappa temple in Kerala reported revenue of Rs 131 crore in 2010-11.

Travancore Malayalee Council

Historical Articles:
Memory of Sabarimala Trip 1936 by His Highness Uthradom Thirunal Marthanda Varma (New)
Grace of Sabarimala by Pandalam Thampuran
Harivarasanam Viswa Mohanam by K.J.Yesu Das
Col. Goda Varma Raja by Her Highness Aswathi Tirunal Gouri Lakshmi Bhai
Sree Padmanabha Perumal by Her Highness Aswathi Tirunal Gouri Lakshmi Bhai  - Part 1
Sree Padmanabha Perumal by Her Highness Aswathi Tirunal Gouri Lakshmi Bhai  - Part 2
Anathapuriyle Vismayam by Prabha Narayana Pillai
Sree Padmanabha ..! by Uma Maheswary  Part 1 (pdf)
Sree Padmanabha ..! by Uma Maheswary  Part 2 (pdf)
Nithicharitham : A Flash Back (Part 1) by Uma Maheswary (pdf)
Nithicharitham : A Flash Back (Part 2) by Uma Maheswary (pdf)







Thiruvarattu Kavile Arittuvazcha by D.Dilip (pdf)

Sree Padmanabhanum Ganitha Joithashavum by T.V.Padmakumar (pdf)
SreePadmanabhaswami Aratt : 423 Years Back History by Uma Maheswary (pdf)
Valsala Shasthriar : Composer of Carnatic Music on Jesus Christ by Achuthsankar S Nair (pdf)
T N Seshagopalan at Navarathri Mandapom: A surprise in variety by Dr Achuthsankar S Nair
Brief Notes on 381 Swathi Composittons by Dr. Achuthsankar S Nair (pdf)
A Royal Lullaby - Omanathinkal kidavo by Dr. Achuthsankar S Nair (pdf)
Swathi Thirunal & Sree Padmanabhaswami Temple Treasures By Dr Achuthsankar S Nair (pdf)
Fire in Sree Padmanabha Temple : 77 Years Back
Sree Padmanabha Temple & Trivandrum City
Gold Coin Missing in Sree Padmanabha Temple - Old History
Old Story about Sree Padmanabha Temple
Hiranyagarfam & Dutch
Murajapam Kanan Kochi Thampuran
British Resident Manro & Sree Padmanabha Temple
Swami Vivekananda & Sree Padmanabha Dasa
Memery : Vancheesha Mangalam (Travancore National Anthem)