Old Steam Roller in madhya pradesh ,Mhow,near Indore city-[Dev Kumar Vasudevan / Blog]

Letter From Mhow: That Old Steam Roller Near The Parsi Library

Dev Kumar Vasudevan
Dev Kumar Vasudevan / Blog / 4 yrs ago /
  10
                                                                           
                    Mhow, Indore, Madhya Pradesh, India.
                    Letter From Mhow: That Old Steam Roller Near the Parsi Library

I wonder how many people in Mhow must have noticed this old road roller lying near the Parsi Library.
The Parsi Library, now defunct, is housed in an old bungalow which you can see in the background of the first photograph. To the left of the Bungalow and hidden by the roller is the tennis court and then there is Dreamland cinema. Anyway, lets get back to the roller. More than a month ago while passing that area I decided to stop and click this steam run road roller.

                    
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I can see, the words: "By Royal Letters Patent No 10442. Aveling And Porter Limited, Rochester, Kent, England"
inscribed on it as the photograph below shows.


                  
                    
A google search led me to the site www.powerhousemuseum.com and from that I came to know a fair amount about the company Aveling and Porter. I quote verbatim from the website:

"In 1850 Thomas Aveling moved his business from Ruckinge, Kent, to Rochester where he was joined by Richard Thomas Porter in 1862 and became Aveling and Porter. The firm's factory was established on the south bank of the Medway River at Rochester and was incorporated in 1895. Aveling and Porter joined the ill-fated Agricultural and General Engineers Ltd in the 1920s and amalgamated with Barford and Perkins Ltd in 1933 to become Aveling-Barford Ltd, which moved from Rochester to Grantham in Lincolnshire."

The company's emblem was a rampant or rearing horse with the word 'Invicta' set in brass on the front of its engines. The horse and scroll form part of the arms of Kent. The rearing horse was a symbol taken from the war banners of the invading chiefs Hengist and Horsa who, in the year AD 449, forced their way across the Thanet coast into Kent. The word 'Invicta' signifies the Men of Kent who were not beaten by William the Conqueror, but rather continued to offer resistance and later made a treaty with him.

                   


The Museum's Aveling and Porter road roller is one of about 8,600 rollers made by the company. It left the factory on 14 May 1923 with the builders No. 10637. Rollers of this type were introduced shortly after the First World War and were amongst the first built by the company on standard jigs to give maximum standardisation of parts."
 

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The previous Letter From Mhow was on the watermelons being sold on Main Street, Mhow and titled