La Ville de Cochin, 1503[CITY OF COCHIN 1503]

La Ville de Cochin, 1503



Four views of Cochin under Dutch occupation - to the North, on the sea side, and two aspects of the land side. Date: 1671. Image from Mary Evans - Prints Online




The City of Cochin at the time of its being taken by Admiral and General Van Goens' - Cochin had been in English hands but the Dutch took it away from them. Date: 8 January 1663. Image from Mary Evans - Prints Online

COCHIN, INDIA, 1663



The King of Cochin riding on an elephant, attended by his Nayro's', c1745. Illustration from Thomas Astley's "A New General Collection of Voyages and Travels; consisting of the most esteemed relations, which have been hitherto published in any language; comprehending everything remarkable in its kind, London, (1745-1747).. Image from Heritage Images

'The King of Cochin riding on an elephant, attended by his Nayro's', c1745.
PLEASE SEE:- THE ANCIENT LONG GUN CARRIED BY A FEW OF THE NAIR SOLDIERS;ONE SUCH GUN CAN STILL BE SEEN IN THE SWATHI THIRUNAL PALACE(KUTHIRA MAALIKA) NEXT TO SRI PADMANBHA SWAMI TEMPLE
Photo of Ancient Gun Collection


The Residency, Cochin.


Photograph of the British Residency Cochin, Kerala, from the Kitchener of Khartoum Collection: Miscellaneous views in India, taken in the 1900s. Cochin (now called Kochi) is situated on the Malabar coast and the name probably derives from 'kocchazhi' meaning the new or small harbour. In the 15th century the area attracted Christian, Arab and Jewish settlers from the Middle East and from 16th century onwards, the Portuguese, Dutch and British competed for control of its port and the lucrative spice trade. The British Residency set in beautiful landscaped gardens on Bolghatty Island was originally built by the Dutch in 1744.




Tellicherry on the coast of Malabar--Artist: Forbes, James

 Medium: Engraving Date: 1813


Tellicherry on the coast of Malabar

Plate thirty-two from the first volume of James Forbes'"Oriental Memoirs". In 1772, Forbes(1749-1819) was appointed Warehousekeeper at the factory in Anjengo, Travancore in South India. His journey to the South of India took him through the coastal towns of Tellicherry, Calicut and Cochin. Here, Forbes(1749-1819)illustrates a view of Tellicherry, founded in 1683 as the major trade-centre for pepper and cardamom in India. Forbes noted, 'The drawing was taken from a ship in the road, and gives a view of this pleasant and healthy settlement, extending from Tellicherry to Maylan, a fort about a mile distant.'The flourishing pepper trade was controlled from this fort built by the British in 1708.





View of the fort of Cochin , from across the backwater, with the union flag flying from the warehouse, formerly the Portuguese cathedral of Santa Cruz

Water-colour painting of the fort of Cochin, from across the backwater by an unknown artist, c.1800. The image is inscribed: 'View of Cochin'.
Cochin (now called Kochi) is situated on the Malabar coast in Kerala, southern India. The name probably derives from kocchazhi meaning the new or small harbour. In the 15th century the area attracted Christian, Arab and Jewish settlers from the Middle East and from 16th century onwards, the Portuguese, Dutch and British competed for control of its port and the lucrative spice trade. The Portuguese fort was built in 1503 and contains many historic buildings set in winding streets.

Beypore, India'--Artist: North, Marianne (1830-1890) Medium: Oil

 on paper Date: 1878

'Beypore, India'
Oil painting on paper by Marianne North of Beypore, dated 1878-1879. Marianne North visited India in 1877-79 and completed over 200 paintings whilst there.

In her autobiography, 'Recollections of a happy life' of 1892, she wrote, "At Beypore I found a large room over the station, a hundred yards from the sea, with a garden between me and it...I enjoyed being at Beypur close to the sea...I could walk on the rocks and sands, watching the shrimps, crabs...I made a long sketch of the river and distant mountains, with endless cocoa-nuts in the middle distance, ferry-boats, and picturesque people. It was very pleasant sitting on the clean sand, but it was hot."


Small vessel used on the coast of Malabar (Cochin), India, c18th century.. Image from Heritage Images

Small vessel used on the coast of Malabar (Cochin), India, c18th century.
PLEASE NOTICE A COVERED BOAT; SIMILAR TO MODERN HOUSE BOAT -MAY BE FOR RICH PEOPLE OF THAT TIME

Tellicherry from the island of Darmadam, or Darmapattam

Water-colour painting of Tellicherry from the island of Darmadam, or Darmapattam, by an unknown artist, c.1790. The inscription, overwritten on the reverse reads: 'Tellicherry from Durmapatam. Hills round Mahe. Charles Point. P[...] Church. Telly Fort House. Ghauts Calick Wells. A Bungalow built by Mr Falconer. Cochin Cundy Fort ditto by Mr Bailie. Codoly Fort. The entrance to the Dumapm & Codoly rivers'.
Tellicherry, founded in 1683, was the first regular settlement on the Malabar coast. The fort was completed in 1708 by the Kolattiri Rajah and handed to the East India Company for the protection of their factory. In 1776 the factory was reduced to a Residency and in 1794 the factory was abolished by Sir John Shore. It has not been possible to identify Falconer and Bailie with certainty; an Alexander Falconer was in the Madras Civil Service at this period.Tellicherry on the coast of Malabar--Artist: Forbes, James Medium:
 Engraving Date: 1813
Tellicherry on the coast of Malabar



f.8   View of Cannanore Bay with fort on the right, Malabar district.  'Cannonore fort & Bay.'

Water-colour painting of the town and harbour of Kannur (Cannanore) by John Johnson (c.1769-1846), c.1795 - 1801. This image is from a sketch-book of 36 drawings (36 folios) depicting scenes chiefly in west India and Mysore (Karnataka) between c.1795-1801.
Kannur is situated on a headland overlooking a picturesque bay in Kerala, in the south of India. Vasco da Gama (1460-1524) the Portuguese explorer who discovered an ocean route from Portugal to the East came to this area in 1498 and it subsequently became an important trading station. The fort of St. Angelo was constructed in 1505 by the first Portuguese Viceroy Don Francisco De Almeda with the consent of the ruling Kolathiri Raja. In 1656 the Dutch expelled the Portuguese and subsequently sold the town to a Moplah family (a community of Arab descent) who claimed sovereignty over the Laccadive Islands, a group of coral reefs and islands off the coast of Kerala. Moplah rule was terminated by the British who attacked and captured Kannur in 1790 and it became their most important military base in the south of India. The barracks, arsenal, cannons and the ruins of a chapel still stand in the fort as a testimony to its glorious history.

KOCHI(COCHIN) 1702




Engraving by Pieter Schenk (1645-1715) of Cochin in Kerala, published by the artist in his 'Totius orbis Terrarum oppida nobiliora centum Amsterdam' of 1702.


Fortified Island on the Malabar Coast in the East Indies, belonging to Tippoo Sultan--Engraver: Jukes, F. Medium: Aquatint Date: 1794

Fortified Island on the Malabar Coast in the East Indies, belonging to Tippoo Sultan
































Aquatint published by F. Jukes in 1794 and part of King George III's Topographical Collection, with a view of an island fort of Tipu Sultan on the Malabar Coast in southern India. It is one of the forts which was ceded to the British during the Third Anglo-Mysore War (1789-92). Tipu Sultan (b.1750-d.1799), was the strong and capable ruler of Mysore who consistently opposed the British as they expanded their control over India. The bitter struggle between the two powers was played out through the Anglo-Mysore Wars and only ended in the Fourth Anglo-Mysore War of 1799, when Tipu was defeated and died fighting while his capital Seringapatam (Srirangapattana) fell to the British.



View of the fort of Cochin , from across the backwater, with the union flag flying from the warehouse, formerly the Portuguese cathedral of Santa Cruz


Water-colour painting of the fort of Cochin, from across the backwater by an unknown artist, c.1800. The image is inscribed: 'View of Cochin'.
Cochin (now called Kochi) is situated on the Malabar coast in Kerala, southern India. The name probably derives from kocchazhi meaning the new or small harbour. In the 15th century the area attracted Christian, Arab and Jewish settlers from the Middle East and from 16th century onwards, the Portuguese, Dutch and British competed for control of its port and the lucrative spice trade. The Portuguese fort was built in 1503 and contains many historic buildings set in winding streets.



Remains of the Fort at Palkod. [Palakoddu.]



This photograph of the remains of the fort at Palakoddu was taken by Linnaeus Tripe in 1858 and is part of a collection



Cochin, on the coast of Malabar-Artist: Forbes, James Medium: Engraving Date: 1813

Cochin, on the coast of Malabar










































Calicut, on the coast of Malabar--Artist: Forbes, James Medium: Engraving Date: 1813

Calicut, on the coast of Malabar
Plate thirty-three from the first volume of James Forbes'"Oriental Memoirs", a work in the form of a series of letters richly illustrated, describing various aspects of nature, people, buildings and places he observed during his travels in India in the 1760s-70s. In 1772, Forbes(1749-1819) was appointed Warehousekeeper at the factory in Anjengo, Travancore in South India. His journey to the South of India took him through the coastal towns of Tellicherry, Calicut and Cochin. Forbes described the historic Calicut town in the erstwhile Malabar in this way: 'This humble fishing-town, scattered among the cocoa-nut woods on the coast of Malabar is all that remains of the grand emporium of Calicut, which was esteemed among the first commercial cities in India, when Vasco Da Gama, arrived there after his adventurous passage round the Cape of Good hope, at the end of the 16th Century.'


photograph taken about 1900 by the Government photographer Zacharias D'Cruz, of the view of waterfront area and roadstead beyond at Alleppey town, in the erstwhile Travancore. It is one of 76 prints in an album entitled 'Album of South Indian Views' of the Curzon Collection. George Nathaniel Curzon was Under Secretary of State at the Foreign Office between 1895-98 and Viceroy of India between 1898-1905.






Anjengo, [ANJU THENGU]on the coast of Malabar--Artist: Forbes, James Medium: Engraving Date: 1813


Anjengo, on the coast of Malabar



Plate thirty-five from the first volume of James Forbes' "Oriental Memoirs". Forbes(1749-1819)was appointed Warehousekeeper of the last English Factory at Anjengo, South Travancore in 1772. While stationed there his chief enjoyment were the excursions he made along the 'fertile plains, the hills clothed by mango, cashers and cassia trees, bounded by the stupendous gauts, towering in rude magnificence'. Forbes found that the 'Portuguese church, the white tombs, a respectable fortress...surrounded by coconut trees, gave Anjengo a pleasing appearance'.





View of the Pier, etc. from the Lighthouse [Alleppey].


Dam, Periyar Lake.--Photographer: Unknown Medium: Photographic print Date: 1900


Dam, Periyar Lake.



View of the dam, Periyar Lake taken by an unknown photographer in the 1900s. The photograph is part of an album containing views of various locations in India, formerly in the collection of Horatio Kitchener, 1st Earl Kitchener of Khartoum and Broome, (1850-1916), who was Commander in Chief of India between 1902 and 1909.
The dam was planned by a British engineer, Colonel Pennycuick and constructed in 1895. It was built across the Periyar River in the Cardamon Hills of the Western Ghats, to provide irrigation to the irrigate the drier parts of neighbouring Tamil Nadu around Madurai. The creation of the dam submerged large tracts of land creating Periyar Lake. The surrounding area with forests was granted protection by the Maharaja of Travancore. In 1934 the area was declared a wildlife sanctuary at the instigation of the Maharaja