The SAILING ship 'Travancore', -1851 -READ THE STORY OF THIS SHIP'S TRAVEL FROM- ENGLAND TO NEW ZEALAND AND TO BRAZIL - GIVEN BELOW

The ship Travancore, 562 tons, Captain, Henry Brown, which arrived at Lyttelton on March 31, 1851, left Gravesend at Noon on Friday, December 6, with a freight of 173 souls, of which eighteen were chief and seventeen fore-cabin passengers. On Sunday, the 8th of December, she lay in the Downs, detained by contrary, winds. Early in the morning of Monday, however, she sailed with a gentle breeze and soon left the shores of England among the remembrances of the past.
During the next ten days we experienced exceedingly rough weather in the chops of the Channel and the Bay of Biscay, says the chronicler. Two kinds of feeling were prevalent at this time -- dismay at being obliged to beat about in fruitless attempts to get out of the Bay, and wonder at the performances and powers of our good ship. At last on the 19th about noon, a fresh fair wind sprang up, enlivening the most desponding and soon reducing the list of sea sick passengers. It was not till then that we began to experience the exhilarating effects of a sea voyage.
The cold and damp of this period proved fatal to nearly the whole of the starlings that had been sent on board in the hope of some of them at least reaching New Zealand. Only four survived the Bay. These also died at a later period in the voyage, except one which escaped from its wiry tenement.
The Travancore now began to prove her sailing powers. She averaged for some time 200 miles daily, and on Thursday, the 26th of December, we saw the loom of Madeira to the eastward of us. Our westerly course extended to within a short distance of the Brazilian coast, passing on Saturday, the 18th of January, at midnight,between Trinidad and the Martin Vas Rocks.
Various and multiplied now became the objects of interest and excitement. The catching of a dolphin or bonita, the phosphorescent appearance of the tropical seas at night, music, dancing, and the usual nautical games all contributed to make the days pass away quickly and pleasantly....
(Source: Lyttelton Times, 10 May 1851, as quoted by Olwyn Whitehouse)