THE MISSING STATUE- TRIVANDRUM CITY -AT MUSEUM EAST GATE -[1950 IT WAS THERE] -BEFORE MUSEUM POLICE STATION WAS MADE -






REGENT-[SENIOR RANI]- Maharani Sethu Lakshmi Bayi -[THE POSE OF THE STATUE AND THE FACE AND THE DRESS   WERE SAME AS ABOVE .]


 I AM ADDING THE PHOTO OF THE JUNIOR MAHARANI SETHU PARVATHY BAI [MOTHER OF THE LATER KING SRI CHITRA THIRUNAL] BELOW - AS A COMMENT HAS COME BELOW THE FIRST PHOTO OF RANI LAKSHMI BAI [READ THE COMMENT BELOW BY ANONYMOUS

JUNIOR[AMMA= MOTHER] MAHARANI SETHU PARVATHY BAI [MOTHER OF LATER KING SRI CHITRA OF TRAVANCORE]
NOW I AM CONFUSED BY THE COMMENT ,BUT IT LOOKS TO ME AS THE FIRST, PHOTO, REGENT -THAN THE SECOND,PHOTO,JUNIOR RANI-AS I HAVE SEEN  THE STATUE  MANY TIMES BEFORE. MAY BE I AM WRONG.THOUGH BOTH RANIS WERE SISTERS I DONT KNOW WHETHER THE JUNIOR RANI   WHO IS SEEN WEARING A SAREE IN THE ABOVE PHOTO ,POSED WITH THE MUNDU DRESS AS  HER SENIOR SISTER .
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MAHATMA GANDHI'S VISIT TO THE TRAVANCORE ROYAL FAMILY IN 1924


Maharani Sethu Lakshmi Bayi -OF TRAVANCORE[NOW KERALA](1924)

In 1925 the Maharani was visited by Mahatma Gandhi. Their meeting resulted in a royal proclamation by which all the public roads and streets in Travancore were thrown open to all Hindus irrespective of caste. Mahatma Gandhi called it a "bedrock of freedom" in his Young India (26 March 1925) magazine while describing the Maharani thus:
My visit to Her Highness was an agreeable surprise for me. Instead of being ushered into the presence of an over decorated woman sporting diamond pendants and necklaces, I found myself in the presence of a modest young woman who relied not upon jewels or gaudy dresses for beauty but on her own naturally well formed features and exactness of manners. Her room was as plainly furnished as she was dressed. Her severe simplicity became an object of my envy. She seemed to me an object lesson for many a prince and many a millionaire whose loud ornamentation, ugly looking diamonds, rings and studs and still more loud and almost vulgar furniture offend the taste and present a terrible and sad contrast between them and the masses from whom they derive their wealth.