Portuguese surrender to Indian troops 1961in Goa


PORTUGUESE Goa border with India
Goa liberation fighters remembered - KARNATAKA - The Hindu
Goa liberation fighters remembered - KARNATAKA - The Hindu

Portuguese troops before operation Vijay at Old Goa

Goa-Invasion-1961: GOA : AN AFRICAN WRITER'S PERSPECTIVE
goa-invasion-1961.blogspot.com
(submitted, courtesy author, by Francisco Monteiro 19 Dec 2001)


Indian annexation of Portuguese India - Wikipedia, the free ...
en.wikipedia.org
Diplomatic efforts to resolve Goa dispute

Goa liberation: How Russia vetoed the West | Russia & India ...

in.rbth.com/blogs/.../goa_liberation_how_russia_vetoed_the_west_4029...
Dec 12, 2014 - In December 1961 Russia stood by India as it liberated Goa and whacked Portugal, a NATO member, which left many in the West with red faces. ... While the British were evicted in 1947, no action was taken against the Portuguese occupation of Goa until 1961 when an Indian military

News: Goa Liberated from Portuguese, 1961 - YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hqj9h563X-Y
Dec 18, 2010 - Uploaded by Goalive Goa
News of Goa freedom from Portuguese by India troops.

Goa Liberation (Episode 1) - YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J_szlFm8pOA
Feb 21, 2013 - Uploaded by Francisco Veres Machado
Episode of the documentary series "Contacto Goa", directed by Francisco Veres Machado, which addresses ...

Goa, India (1961) - When India Freed Goa From The ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zJRyQAymSC8
Sep 6, 2014 - Uploaded by hindu judaic
Goa, India (1961) - When India Freed Goa From The Portuguese ... 50 years of Goa's Liberation to be ...

Goa liberated from Portuguese on this day - YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tMapFXDTbsc
Dec 18, 2014 - Uploaded by DD News
The Liberation of Goa was quite a momentous occasion in the already chequered Goan history. December ...

Goa History - YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HkfHh3DKQ_s
Dec 28, 2011 - Uploaded by Shailesh Bhinde
Complete Goa history Story type. ... Goa Church has asked the state to withdraw a controversial documentary ...

Goa Liberation (Episode 2) - YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QQlc-slR9qY
Feb 21, 2013 - Uploaded by Francisco Veres Machado
Episode of the documentary series "Contacto Goa", directed by Francisco Veres Machado, which addresses ...

Indian Armed Forces re-integrate Goa into the Indian ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sFgIX3pAv3A
Aug 6, 2011 - Uploaded by Luptonga
USA & Europe very annoyed Goa Liberation http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1961_Indian_annexation_of_Goa ...

India Ends Imperialist Portugal's Occupation Of Goa ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oXCVRu9miGU
Mar 7, 2013 - Uploaded by Luptonga
India Ends Imperialist Portugal's Occupation Of Goa - Portuguese Troops ... '71 INDIA PAKISTAN WAR ...

Jai Gomantak - Celebrating 50 Years of Goa's Liberation ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l7mW3H7HkdA
Dec 19, 2011 - Uploaded by ashish9500music
Music by Ashish Prabhu Ajgaonkar Lyrics by Tushar Kamat Vocals by Gautam Naik A song written, composed ...

Mr Kaul on India invasion of the Portuguese colony of Goa ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VRWTzp3RlJk
Nov 13, 2011 - Uploaded by hijazna
Interviews: Mr Kaul on the Indian action in the Portuguese territory of Goa; Dr Noggarrah, Portuguese Foreign ...




Letter of surrender signed by Manuel António Vassalo e Silva to Kunhiraman Palat Candeth signifying the official surrender of Goa from Portuguese Rule
The armed action, codenamed Operation Vijay by Indian government, involved air, sea and land strikes for over 36 hours, and was a decisive victory for India, ending 451 years of Portuguese colonial rule in Goa. Thirty-four Indians and thirty-one Portuguese were killed in the fighting. The brief war drew a mixture of worldwide praise and condemnation. In India, the action was seen as a liberation of historically Indian territory, while Portugal viewed it as aggression against a long-held colonial possession.Newsletter. Issue 26. December 17, 2011

The Liberation of Goa
 
'Operation Vijay', when the Indian Army marched into Goa and liberated it on December 19, 1961 from the Portuguese rule, will be felicitated this month when the state celebrates 50 years of its independence.

In this special section displays links to articles on the Liberation.

Important Note: The statements, opinions, or views in the articles may not necessarily reflect that of the Goan Voice Canada.

To read more click on below list:
 
The Liberation Of Goa: 1961 –An Overview
Source: http://corvalliscommunitypages.com/asia_pacific/goa.htm

Goa remained a Portuguese colony after the British left India. The Portuguese refused to give up their colonies in-spite of repeated requests of India. The struggle was two fold. From within Goa and from the Indian Government outside Goa.

Even though the Portuguese assumed that India had renounced the use of force, both the Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru as well as the defense minister, Krishna Menon made it clear that India would not fail to resort to force as an option, if all diplomatic efforts to make the Portuguese give up Goa fail.

The Build Up

After years of Negotiation, in late 1961, The government decided to deploy the armed forces in an effort to evict the Portuguese out of Goa and other Enclaves. Accordingly in November 1961, India made preparations for the same. Lt. Gen. Chaudhari of the Southern Army deputed 17 Infantry Division under Major General K.P. Candeth along with the 50th Para Brigade. To carry out the occupation of Daman, one infantry battalion - 1st Maratha LI - was assigned. Two battalions, 20th Rajput and 4th Madras, were assigned the task of taking over Diu.

The Portuguese were suspected to have some supersonic interceptors initially. Later it was believed that though fighters were not based, they maintained a regular supply chain by air. Facing this modest and insignificant air threat was amassed a huge Indian Air Force detachment. India had by that time six Hunter squadrons and four Canberra squadrons as its latest additions to the Air Force.

The Indian Air Force was requested to provide support elements to this massive ground force. The AOC-in-C of the Western Air Command, Air Vice Marshal Erlic Pinto, was appointed theater commander of all air forces in the Goan Operations.

Pinto had his HQs in Poona, Looking after all the operations in Daman, Diu and Goa. One Tactical Air Center, the No.2 TAC, was allocated to the Goa Sector. This TAC under Air Commodore Shivdev Singh conducted operations in conjunction with HQ 17 Division. Operations in Daman were to be the responsibility of No.2 Wing and Diu was directly under the Armament Training Wing at Jamnagar.

The main staging airbases were Poona and Sambre. Poona hosted two Canberra Squadrons No.16 and No.35 along with a Hunter force from No.17 and No.37 Squadrons.

It was at Sambre that most of the air component concentrated in. Sambre was initially raised to fulfill the requirement of a Forward Base from which support could be extended to Goa. No.45 Squadron had their main detachment of 8 aircraft based there. No.17 had one detachment of Hunters for air defence. And Harvards, Otters and Mi-4 helicopters formed the communication and command duties.

Goa Operations

The build up to the operations started on 2 December 1961. Probing flights by some fighters and bombers were carried out on December 8th and 9th to lure and draw out any Portuguese air opposition that may have been there. A Vampire, from No.108 Squadron, flew a PR Mission over some strategic targets without encountering opposition. These baiting missions were flown right up to D-Day, trying to draw out the Portuguese Air Force, but to no avail.

Then on D-Day 18 December, the Army Chief had sent a directive for the air force to take out specific targets. Namely:
  1. Dabolim airfield to be made unusable but at the same time ensure the terminals & facilities are not damaged.
  2. The Wireless Station at Bambolim to be knocked out.
  3. Close support to the land forces.
  4. Denial of use of Diu and Daman airfields. However, these airfields are not to be attacked without Prior approval.
The first use of air power occurred on December 18th. No.35 Squadron sent in a massive wave of 12 Canberras led by the CO, Wg. Cdr. N.B. Menon to attack Dabolim. The Canberras dropped 63,000 lbs. of bombs within minutes, on the runway. The Canberra pilots took care not to bomb the Terminals and the ATC. Menon noticed the presence of two large transport aircraft in the dispersal area. One Super Constellation and one DC-6 aircraft were parked on the apron. However the Canberras left the aircraft alone.

A second raid by eight Canberras of No.16 Squadron led by Wg. Cdr. Surinder Singh dropped more bombs on the runway area. The Portuguese aircraft were again left untouched. By this time, it was assumed that the airfield was rendered unserviceable and these aircraft can be captured intact as they had no where to go. However the Portuguese pilots of these aircraft proved to be both foolhardy but brave. During nightfall, they managed to take off the aircraft from the still damaged airfield and made their getaway to Portugal.

Meanwhile six Hunters of No.17 Sqn led by the CO, Sqn. Ldr. Jayant Singh took off from Sambre and attacked the Wireless station at Bambolim. Attacking with a mixture of rockets and gun cannon ammunition, the station was soon left a smoldering wreck.

The Army requested close support now and then. And usually Vampires of No.45 flew Cabrank over the sector to respond to any call for the support. However Two Vampires of No.45 made a mistake when called by troops of the 50th Para Brigade. They fired rockets into the positions of the 2 Sikh LI Bn injuring two.

The Sikhs on the other hand got their own back and fired at an Unmarked Harvard flying from Sambre putting a couple of holes into the aircraft. These were the only two untoward incidents in the sector. Shortly before the surrender on the 19th, the Liberators of No.6 Sqn flew over Marmagao in a leaflet-dropping mission. Heralding the surrender of the Portuguese in this Sector.

Daman sector saw about 14 Sorties by Mysteres of No.1 Squadron flying from Santa Cruz. Flying in pairs of two, the Mysteres harassed Portuguese gun positions continuously throughout the day. The major air effort of the Goa Operations were directed at the smaller enclave of Diu. At the southern tip of the Kataiwar coast.

Diu Operations

The Nearest Airfield to Diu was the airbase at Jamnagar where the Armament training wing was located. ATW Jamnagar had clear instructions not to mount offensive action against the Diu airfield without clearance from the Advanced HQ of 20th Rajput, the battalion on the ground. However on the morning of 18th, contact could not be established with the ground forces and the CO, ATW decided to launch a strike against the airfield at around 1100 hours.

Four Toofanis armed with 1000 lbs. bombs took off from Jamnagar arriving over the Diu airfield in minutes. The leader of the Toofanis, noticed some white flags being waved from the area surrounding the airfield which he assumed as a sign of surrender. Added to the confusion was a garbled message received by the Toofani flight about, "the airfield is in our hands". Assuming the surrender had already taken place, the flight leader took the Toofanis over to the sea and jettisoned their bombs into the sea! It was only after returning to the base that they found out that no surrender took place. The white flags noticed near the airfield were actually Dhobies washings hung out in the open to dry!

Two Toofanis took off again at 1400 hours and bombed the intersection of the runways at Diu. Another four Toofanis followed up later on rocketing the control tower, wireless station and the meteorological station.

Meanwhile Poona had planned for a massive strike by two waves of 8 Canberras each to bomb the Diu airfield. But the proximity of ground troops near the airfield prevented the deployment and the raid was called off. Around the same time, four Vampires flying from Jamnagar over the sea near Diu, noticed a Fast Patrol Boat traveling out of the Diu harbour. Upon closer observation, the Vampires were fired at by the Boat. Fg. Off. P.M. Ramachandran - the lead pilot - immediately engaged with gunfire and rockets and sank the patrol boat. For this feat he received the Shaurya Chakra.

Diu received the maximum air effort of all the three theatres during the Goa operations. With nearly 67 sorties being flown by aircraft from Jamnagar and elsewhere. All expenditure of ammunition ceased by the end of the second day, the surrender had all but taken place formally.

Epilogue

Portuguese Governer, Manuel Anonia Vassalo De Silva, signed the surrender document on December 19th and 3306 Portugese troops of European origin laid down their arms. They were repatriated to Portugal after a few months.

The Goa operations gave the IAF an opportunity to employ jet air power for the first time on a massive scale. However that the Portuguese did not have any AA defences nor aircraft to defend their positions. This robbed the IAF of a realistic battlefield scenario. It was not until 1965 that the combat potential of the air force was actually put to test.

Air Vice Marshal Erlic Pinto went on to become the AOC-in-C Western Air Command. He was killed in an helicopter crash in May 1963. Air Commodore Shivdev Singh became AOC-in-C Eastern Command. He retired as the Vice-Chief of Air Staff.

Diplomatic relations between Portugal and India were cut off for decades, and only recently did things cooled between the two nations, with Portugal agreeing to return the gold and assets held by their national bank. Hopefully this small conflict with the European nation was the last against a western nation.
 
The Liberation of Goa - An Overview
http://www.bharat-rakshak.com/IAF/History/1961Goa/1012-Goa01.html
http://www.bharat-rakshak.com/IAF/History/1961Goa/1050-Raghavendran.html
http://www.bharat-rakshak.com/IAF/History/1961Goa.html


Air Vice Marshal Erlic Pinto, discusses with the TAC Commander, Air Commodore Shivdev Singh, at a forward area. Seen in the background is a Mi-4 Helicopter. Seen in the middle is Wg Cdr S Raghavendran, from Ops Command.

Pinto had his HQs in Poona, Looking after all the operations in Daman, Diu and Goa. One Tactical Air Center, the No.2 TAC, was allocated to the Goa Sector. This TAC under Air Commodore Shivdev Singh conducted operations in conjunction with HQ 17 Division. Operations in Daman were to be the responsibility of No.2 Wing and Diu was directly under the Armament Training Wing at Jamnagar.

The main staging airbases were Poona and Sambre. Poona hosted two Canberra Squadrons No.16 and No.35 along with a Hunter force from No.17 and No.37 Squadrons. It was at Sambre that most of the air component concentrated in. Sambre was initially raised to fulfill the requirement of a Forward Base from which support could be extended to Goa. No.45 Squadron had their main detachment of 8 aircraft based there. No.17 had one detachment of Hunters for air defence. And Harvards, Otters and Mi-4 helicopters formed the communication and command duties.

http://www.colaco.net/1/GdeFdabolim3.htm
 
Goa to felicitate Operation Vijay veterans
http://zeenews.india.com/news/goa/goa-to-felicitate-operation-vijay-veterans_745150.html
Last Updated: Saturday, December 03, 2011, 14:22


Panaji: Army veterans who participated in 'Operation Vijay', when the Indian Army marched into Goa and liberated it from the Portuguese rule, will be felicitated later this month when the state celebrates 50 years of its independence.

Speaking to reporters, Chief Minister Digambar Kamat said Chief of Army Staff General V.K. Singh will be present at the celebratory function.  "The soldiers who were part of Operation Vijay (Dec 19, 1961) will be felicitated. We will also honour the chief of the Indian Army on behalf of Goans," Kamat said.

Kamat also said that Prime Minister Manmohan Singh was also scheduled to attend the function, but a pending Russia visit and the ongoing parliament schedule might just weigh heavy on the prime minister's mind. He further said that a string of cultural programmes will be held as part of the anniversary celebrations to mark the end of nearly 450 years of Portuguese rule here.

IANS
 
Goa's Freedom Movement
By: Lambert Mascarenhas
Co-Founder & Former Editor of Goa Today, Panaji.

http://www.goacom.com/culture/history/history4.html
 
Goa's Liberation by India, ANIMATION !!
http://www.goacom.com/culture/history/vijay/vijay2.html
 
1961 Indian annexation of Goa
http://uk.ask.com/wiki/Invasion_of_Goa

The 1961 Indian annexation of Goa (also referred to as Invasion of Goa, the Liberation of Goa and the Portuguese-Indian War [citation needed]), was an action by India's armed forces that ended Portuguese rule in its Indian enclaves in 1961. The armed action, codenamed Operation Vijay by the Indian government, involved air, sea and land strikes for over 36 hours, and was a decisive victory for India, ending 451 years of Portuguese colonial rule in Goa. Thirty-four Indians and thirty-one Portuguese were killed in the fighting. The brief conflict drew a mixture of worldwide praise and condemnation. In India, the action was seen as a liberation of historically Indian territory, while Portugal viewed it as an aggression against national soil.
Indian troops enter Goa
 
Indian troops enter Goa
GOANS ARE HAPPY TO SEE INDIAN TROOPS-[SEE THE POVERTY OF PORTUGUESE GOA ]
 the surrender ofPortuguese forces

Portuguese Soldiers Surrendering to Indian Army
File:Liberation cheer.jpg
Indian troops are greeted by crowds of Goans as they march through the streets of Panjim, shortly after the
Portuguese retreat.
File:Vasco Da gama POW camp.jpg
The Indian Chief of Army Staff, Gen. Pran Thapar (far right) with deposed Governor General of Portuguese India Manuel António Vassalo e Silva (seated centre) at a POW facility in Vasco Da Gama, Goa
The official Portuguese surrender was conducted in a formal ceremony held at 2030 hours on the 19th of December when Governor General Manuel António Vassalo e Silva signed the instrument of surrender bringing to an end 451 years of Portuguese Rule in Goa. In all, 4668 personnel were taken prisoner by the Indians - a figure which included military and civilian personnel, Portuguese, Africans and Goan.
Upon the surrender of the Portuguese governor general, Goa, Daman and Diu was declared a federally administered Union Territory placed directly under the President of India, and Maj. Gen. K. P. Candeth was appointed as its military governor. The war had lasted two days. India lost 34 killed and 51 wounded. Portugal lost 31 killed, 57 wounded, and 4668 captured.
On 18 December, even as Indian forces were rolling into Goa, a special emergency session of the United Nations Security Council was convened at the request of the Portuguese Government. At the meeting, called to consider the Indian invasion of Portuguese territories in Goa, Daman and Diu, Adlai Stevenson, the US representative to the UN, criticized the Indian military action. He then submitted a draft resolution that called for a cease fire, a withdrawal of all Indian forces from Goa, and the resumption of negotiations. This resolution was co-sponsored by France, UK and Turkey, but failed after the Soviet Union, India’s long time cold war ally, exercised its veto.
Upon receiving news of the fall of Goa, the Portuguese government formally severed all diplomatic links with India and refused to recognize the incorporation of the seized territories into the Indian Republic. An offer of Portuguese citizenship was instead made to all Goan natives who wished to emigrate to Portugal than remain under Indian rule.
Relations between India and Portugal thawed only in 1974, when, following a military coup d'état and the fall of the authoritarian corporatist rule in Lisbon, Goa was finally recognised as part of India, and steps were taken to re-establish diplomatic relations with India. In 1992, Portuguese President Mário Soares became the first Portuguese head of state to visit Goa after its annexation by India. This followed Indian President R. Venkataraman’s visit to Portugal in 1990.
Following their surrender, the Portuguese soldiers were interned by the Indian Army ,The captivity lasted for six months
Ex- governor Manuel António Vassalo e Silva was greeted with a hostile reception when he returned to Portugal. He was subsequently court martialed for failing to follow orders, expelled from the military and was sent into exile. He returned to Portugal only in 1974, after the fall of the regime,
In an article titled "India, The Aggressor", The New York Times on 19 December 1961, stated "With his invasion of Goa Prime Minister Nehru has done irreparable damage to India's good name and to the principles of international morality
Nikita Khrushchev, the de facto Soviet leader, telegraphed Nehru stating that there was "unanimous acclaim" from every Soviet citizen for "Friendly India"
China neither condemned nor applauded the invasion, it was enjoying cordial relations with India, although theSino-Indian War would begin only months later



A Canberra PR.9 taking off. The Indian Air Force used the small and lightweight Canberra bombers.


File:Terakhol liberation attempt.jpg
A 1954 attempt by unarmed protesters to storm Goa and liberate it was suppressed by the Portuguese.
Nehru-639x336.jpg
www.indianmartyr.com
At last, on the requests of Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru, the military attacked Goa on December 17, 1961. Approximately 30,000 Indian ground troops







The Portuguese Governor general Vassalo da Silva surrendered.


portuguese and colonial TROOPS INSIDE BASILICA BOM JESUS 1961

PORTUGUESE TROOPS INSIDE GOA CHURCH

i n s vikrant TOOK PART IN THE WAR

Image result for THE LAST PORTUGUESE TROOPS FLYING OUT
THE LAST PORTUGUESE TROOPS FLYING OUT


19TH DECEMBER 1961GOA CELEBRATES FREEDOM AFTER 450 YEARS OF PORTUGUESE RULE

 


Goan Origin Antonio Costa elected Prime Minister of Portugal

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Published Date : Friday, November 27th, 2015  Time posted: 3:23 pm      By - Team Mangalorean (Inputs from YahooNews)

Mangaluru: Antonio Costa, the popular and charismatic three-term mayor of Lisbon-Portugal of the Socialist Party has become the Prime Minister of Portugal. Antonio Costa, who traces his paternal roots to Goa, and the leader of Portugal’s Socialist Party was named prime minister and tasked with forming a government on Wednesday after weeks of political instability caused by an inconclusive election last month. It is learnt that Antonio’s family members used to call him ‘Babush’, a commonly used term of endearment in Konkani for ‘little boy’.
Costa
But the ‘little boy’ over the years has assumed key positions in the Portuguese government, apart from the incumbent office of Leader of Opposition and Mayor of Lisbon. Antonio has also served as the minister for internal administration, minister of justice, minister for parliamentary affairs among others in his political career which stretches over nearly three decades.
Portugal’s ‘Gandhi’, 54-year-old Antonio Costa, who has become the new Prime Minister of Portugal after the coalition of leftist parties reached a majority, has a Goan connection. Kin and supporters of the left-leaning former Lisbon mayor, who won Portuguese hearts and earned the humble moniker after he transformed the fortunes of Mouraria, a drug-infested and prostitution-ridden neighbourhood of the Capital, cannot contain their joy as Costa appears to be just a step away from taking over reins of the debt-ridden former colonial country, which ruled Goa for 451 years.
“Yes, we are definitely proud of how he has managed to reach the top echelons of the Portuguese political sphere,” Antonio’s first cousin, Anna Kaarina Jussilainen CostaImage result for Anna Kaarina Jussilainen Costa told reporters in Goa. Anna lives in the more-than-a-century-old Costa ancestral house, one of the many which line the stunning Rua Abade Faria in Margao town. Anna’s mother and Antonio’s paternal aunt Sinikka Jussilainen Costa, also has fond memories of Antonio’s Goa sojourns. “On one of his later visits, some 15 years ago, he came to Goa along with a Portuguese parliamentary delegation. He visited us here. He will succeed and ensure Portuguese does not follow the way of Greece,” she said. “Now he has made us all so proud… He was always keen on politics. There used to be endless debates between him and his father over political issues,” she says as she recalls his visits to Goa.
Antonio Costa is the son of Orlando Costa, an accomplished poet and writer.Antonio’s grandfather, Luis Afonso Maria da Costa, hailed from Goa.The appointment comes after Costa’s anti-austerity alliance with communists Greens and the Left bloc toppled the 11-day-old con servative minority govern ment in a dramatic parlia mentary vote earlier this month. Portugal’s political difficulties are being closely watched in Brussels and Costa has sought to allay fears his anti-austerity drive could propel the country back to deficit-busting policies that forced it into a three-year $83 billion bailout in 2011.
Costa, the son of the ferociously anti-colonial writer, the late Orlando da Costa, whose classic ‘O Signo da Ira’ is set in the Margao neighborhoods he grew up in the 1930s and 40s. Later, when studying in Portugal, the senior Costa became a staunch opponent of the Salazar dictatorship, member of the (then outlawed) Communist Party, and a well-known Lisbon intellectual who retained life-long affection and connection to his ancestral Goa.
His son is a political prodigy. Antonio Luis dos Santos da Costa has been Portugal’s minister of parliamentary affairs, minister of justice, and minister of internal administration. He headed his party’s list for the 2004 European elections then served on the committee on civil liberties, justice and home affairs, before becoming one of just 14 vice-presidents of the European Parliament.
In 2007, Costa gambled big. He ran for Lord Mayor of Lisbon, the troubled centerpiece of an urban area where nearly 30% of Portugal’s population lives. After winning, he immediately moved his office to Mouraria, a notoriously crime-infested locality, where he started getting rid of the drug-peddling and prostitution that used to flourish all around. Similar efforts steadily extended city-wide.
Despite the prevailing wrenching national economic crisis, Lisbon has transformed: it is now the safest, cleanest, greenest, and most livable big city in Europe. Its mayor has been re-elected three times. When Costa won the right to lead his Socialist Party in September 2014, it seemed certain he would sweep to power in the 2015 elections. But despite the prime ministerial candidate’s overwhelming personal popularity, things have not quite turned out that way.

COMMENT:- NOW PORTUGAL IS IN GOAN HANDS!!
REVENGE OF THE OLD COLONY CALLED GOA?

Antonio Costa's Goan kin popped the bubbly to celebrate his becoming Portugal PM

Anna Costa, Antonio's first cousin in Margao, Goa, is excited at the news that he has become the new Prime Minister of Portugal
Antonio Costa, who traces his paternal roots to Goa, and is the leader of Portugal's Socialist Party was named prime minister on Wednesday.
Antonio's grandfather, Luis Afonso Maria da Costa, hailed from Goa. Antonio's father Orlando and uncle Joao were born in Mozambique to parents of Goan origin, and spent their childhood in Goa before moving to Portugal. While Orlando stayed on in Portugal, Joao returned in 1965.
Anna Costa, Antonio's first cousin in Margao, Goa, could barely contain her excitement at the news that he has become the PM.
Costa’s Uncle Joao da Costa’s Finnish wife Sinikka Jussilainen  Costa(right), and his first cousin Anna Costa. Pic/Joseph Zuzarte
Costa’s Uncle Joao da Costa’s Finnish wife Sinikka Jussilainen  Costa(right), and his first cousin Anna Costa. Pic/Joseph Zuzarte
She said they received confirmation, through Whatsapp, of the news from Antonio's half-brother in Portugal, Ricardo, who is director of a newspaper in Lisbon.
ALSO READ: We're just waiting to celebrate, say Portuguese PM Antonio Costa's Goan family
"We've interacted (with Ricardo) a little bit since this news broke. He's very busy, as you can imagine. Ricardo's the one who confirmed the news for us," Anna said.
"We're very happy and wish him all the very best."
Portugal's new PM Antonio Costa
Portugal PM Antonio Costa
And how do they plan to celebrate the swearing-in of her first cousin later tonight? (Goa gets the Portuguese RTP satellite channel)
"I've already popped the champagne! And we're going to pop more champagne tonight and the next few days," she said, laughing giddyly.