STORY -- CURSE OF THE KOHINOOR DIAMOND

 It was the property of kakatiya kings of south india 1200 AD


                                                              GOLCONDA FORT
The Khilji dynasty,commander Ulugh Khan in 1323 to defeated the Kakatiya  king Prataparudra,and looted the kohinoor diamond
                                                                   Sultan Ala-ud-din Khilji.
Next it is found in the hands of kachwaha kings of city of gwalior ;inherited by tomara kings of 14th century

                                                                    Kachwaha fort at rohtas


                                                         tomb of king sikander lodi at delhi
Tomara kings were defeated by sikander lodi sultan of delhi & the diamond looted ;
Next it comes in the hands of moghal emperors

                                                                    moghal emperor akbar

 In 1734 nader shah of persia (iran)looted it from moghals,after destroying delhi and agra

                                                         Nader shah of persia
Next Nader shah is killed and the diamond comes into the hands of ahmed shah abdali of Afganistan

                                                    Ahmad shah abdali OF Afganistan
N ext in 1830 the deposed king shah shuja of Afganistan flees with the diamond

                                                    
                                                    Shuja Shah Durrani of Afghanistan
N ext it comes in the hand of punjab king maharaja Ranjit king and on his death


                                                            Maharajah Ranjit singhit came in the
hands of the british
                                                             Queen Victoria



                                            [  Many  of the owners of the diamond had violent deaths   ]
 Now it is in british hands from 1840's
FUTURE:-
LET US WAIT AND SEE WHAT HAPPENS NEXT  BECAUSE OF THE CURSE OF THE KOHINOOR;EVERYTIME  SOMETHING TERRIBLE HAPPENED;TO THE OWNER OF THE DIAMOND WITHIN  A SHORT TIME OF GETTING  THE DIAMOND.

EACH OF THE PREVIOUS OWNER'S(KING'S) KINGDOMS WERE DESTROYED AND  THEIR EMPIRES  ALSO WIPED OUT OR HAVE BECOME PART OF ANOTHER COUNTRY.

 ALREADY BRITISH EMPIRE IS GONE .NOW WHAT WILL HAPPEN??
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Scottish independence: What are the legal steps to a referendum?


Man dressed in saltire flag outside polling booth  

Regions of United Kingdom


Regions of United Kingdom
A legal process takes place before electors vote in the referendum
The legal authority to hold a referendum resides with the UK parliament at Westminster.
On Monday, the prime minister David Cameron and Scotland's first minister Alex Salmond signed an agreement which temporarily transfers that authority to the Scottish Parliament, using an order under Section 30 of the Scotland Act 1998.
The order will be debated in the House of Commons and House of Lords before going to the Privy Council for approval, which is likely to be given in February.
The transfer of powers includes all detail relating to the referendum.
MPs and peers will have no subsequent role in the process.
Rather, MSPs in the Scottish Parliament will debate the details of the poll - including the question, the timing and the franchise - in a Referendum Bill, which is expected to be introduced next spring.
Given that the Scottish National Party has a majority at Holyrood, it seems certain that the SNP policy of extending the vote to 16- and 17-year-olds will be approved.
The SNP's preferred timing for the poll, autumn 2014, is also likely to become law.
In the meantime, it is expected that the Scottish government will formally ask the Electoral Commission to "test" its proposed question.
The question which was outlined in the Scottish consultation on the referendum is: "Do you agree that Scotland should be an independent country?"
The testing by the Electoral Commission involves research with experts and with the public.

Electoral Commission guidelinesIn assessing the referendum question it must....

  • be easy to understand
  • be to the point
  • be unambiguous
  • avoid encouraging voters to consider one response more favourably than another
  • and avoid misleading voters.
The process could take up to 12 weeks, after which the commission will submit a report to the Scottish government.
The recommendations are advisory, not binding, and ministers could theoretically choose to ignore them.
More likely they could accept the report, which might include tweaks to the the wording of the question, or they could suggest an alternative question.
The commission would then give its view on the alternative. If it had already considered that alternative during the initial testing period this could happen almost immediately, if not that process might have to begin anew.
Exactly how 16- and 17-year-olds would be enfranchised is complicated.
The challenge would be how to get them all on the electoral register in time for the poll.
The register is at present geared towards ensuring that all eligible voters are registered by the time they reach the voting age of 18.
A possible ballot paper question The ballot paper question as proposed by the Scottish government earlier this year
Ordinarily the electoral roll is canvassed annually, although individual voters can register up to 11 working days before any poll.
Inconveniently, the 2014 canvas would have been held in the autumn, but changes being proposed in the Electoral Registration and Administration Bill presently being considered at Westminster would shift that year's canvas to April.
The age at which someone can first be listed on the register is complicated.
According to the Representation of the People Act 1983: "A person otherwise qualified is ... entitled to be registered in a register of parliamentary electors or local government electors if he will attain voting age before the end of the period of 12 months beginning with the 1st December next following the relevant date..."
In other words, not all 16- and 17-year-olds would be eligible under the present rules, which are reserved to Westminster.

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WILL BRITAIN AS A NATION WILL ALSO DISAPPEAR AS PART OF THE EUROPEAN UNION?

News » International

Can't return Kohinoor diamond to India: Britain

PTI
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The UK has rejected India’s fresh demand to return its priceless artefacts like Kohinoor diamond and Sultanganj Buddha “stolen” during the British colonial rule, citing a law that prevents it from giving back the items.
“The British Museum Act 1963 prevents our national museums from removing items...the government has no plan to change the law,” the Foreign and Commonwealth Office said.
It made the statement in response to an appeal by Gautam Sengupta, Director—General of Archaeological Survey of India (ASI). The ASI is planning to join a campaign with the support of UNESCO and other countries to get back the artefacts.
In an interview to The Independent, Mr. Sengupta had said, “As efforts so far to reclaim stolen treasures have proved futile, UNESCO support is required for launching an international campaign to achieve this end” as India’s treasures held abroad are “too long to handle” and require “diplomatic and legal campaign“.
Decisions taken by museum trustees
The British Foreign and Commonwealth Office spokeswoman said that there is a strong public feeling on the restitution debate and decisions are taken by museum trustees in which politicians do not interfere.
“It’s a long—established principle in the UK, supported by successive governments.” The British law only permits return of human remains and objects lost during the “Nazi era“.
Mughal era’s Kohinoor diamond, Sultanganj Buddha, rechristened as the Birmingham Buddha, Amravati railings, a series of limestone carvings dating back to 100 AD, Saraswati idol, a sculpture of the deity from the Bhoj temple, are among the items on the ASI’s list.
There is a mounting pressure on the erstwhile colonial countries to restitute heritage items as “not only India, various countries like Mexico, Peru, China, Bolivia, Cyprus and Guatemala also voiced similar concern” and are planning to join the UNESCO campaign, the ASI chief said.