British rulers policy was to keep India poor; buy cycles[and cars and everything ] from england to sqeeze money out of india and other colonies || now poor british queen was forced to travel by train ; yesterday's photo;not even a special train for her !! without income from India; England has real financial problems



India was not allowed to make cycles till the British rulers were forced ;due to second world war .
Before that a few small cycle parts were being made in punjab
Once British rulers left India in 1947 government of india made compulsory import substitution and banned cycle imports from 1957
NOW {WITHOUT INDIA}

The British queen was forced to travel by train ;that too not a special train on dec 18 2009




THEN {WITH INDIA AS COLONY}

The Welcome at Salimgarh Fort

The Welcome at Salimgarh Fort. Old Delhi Railway station was not considered fit to stage . a Royal welcome{!!!!!!!!!!!}





The Coronation Durbar of 12th of December 1911(click on photo to see bigger)

The King and Queen walking(photo)(click on photo to see bigger)


Queen Mary Leaving Dilli Gate 1911(click on photo to see bigger)

The Royal Hunt--only 5 tigers --!!(click on photo to see bigger)

The Arrival of British king and queen at Apollo Bunder{Gate way of india made for their arrival}at Bombay
(click on photo to see bigger)

David J. Lynch, USA TODAY:"The British are in a deeper hole. … They specialized in finance in a way that may prove unsustainable," says Simon Johnson, former chief economist of the International Monetary Fund.

The U.K. has the worst of all worlds. … (It is) at the beginning of an adjustment that is going to weigh on
growth for a protracted period," said Malcolm Barr, an economist at JPMorgan Chase.

JPMorgan's Barr says the economy will be hit with "a tidal wave of job losses" in the next few months.

Even the banks that refused the government's initial offer of capital,-------------
------------------------------------------------------------------------------- because of their exposure to now-tottering emerging-markets borrowers, says Willem Buiter, a former member of the Bank of England's monetary policy committee