VENAD PALACE IN RUINS /KANYAKUMARI ,INDIA/HOPE SOMEBODY WILL COME FOREWARD TO BRING THIS PALACE BACK TO THE OLD GLORY /IT WILL BE A GOOD TOURIST SPOT














A lost palace at Eraniel
Eraniel Palace at Marthandom (near
Padmanabhapuram) adjoining the state
of Kerala, which has witnessed many a
decisive change in the history of
Travancore, is dying. There are no clear
records that are left out in history about
the construction of this palace at Eraniel.
Yet, it is presumed that Eraniel palace was
constructed during the reign of Vanchi
Marthanda Varma of the Venad dynasty
about five hundred years ago.
When Padmanabhapuram
(Kalkulam) Palace was completed in 1601
the King Ravi Varma Kulashekhara
shifted the seat of power to
Padmanabhapuram and Eraniel was
maintained as the sub capital. The
historical importance of Eraniel palace is
also connected with Marthanda Varma
Maharaja who is rightly regarded as the
maker of modern Travancore. The palace
at Eraniel has always glittered in the
chronicles of Venad and later Travancore
and the ruining sight of the palace evokes


pain in the hearts of those who are
devoted lovers of history.
The palace compound which spreads
over slightly more than three- and- a- half
acres only now consists of three
identifiable parts - the Padippura or the
majestic entrance way (now in total
ruins), the main palace (also called
Kuthiramalika) and third the
vasanthamandapam (spring pavilion).
The central courtyard of this typical
nalukettu played a major role in the dayto-
day life of the occupants, as this
became an extension of the interior
function into the semi exteriors. The
upper level rooms also have an important
relationship with the courtyard. There is
a verandah, which runs all along the
ground floor of the Kuthiramalika
serving as a buffer and circulation space
for the building. The Vasanthamalika,
which used to be the spring palace of the
King, has an Ottakkal Kattil (one stone
cot), which is remarkable for its rich stone
carvings. Above this is a wooden pavilion
adorned with wooden decorations
depicting episodes from Ramayana.