1933 WELLINGTON(VICEROY)INAUGURATED TRIVANDRUM WATER WORKS MADE BY KING SRI CHITHIRA 1928


PIPE LINE TUNNEL FOR WATER

Water Works and Drainage: A scheme to supply the town of Trivandrum with water was under consideration for over half a century, but Water Works and it was left to the year 1103 M.E. to witness the first beginnings of its realisation. In 1921 a report with estimate was prepared by the then Chief Engineer, Mr. F.J. Jacob, The scheme provided for the water supply from the Karamana river at Aruvikkara to a prospective population of 1,75,000 souls at the end of 1946, occupying an area of 18 square miles. The scheme was examined by Mr. J. W. Madeley, M.A., M.I.C.E. M.A, M. Soc., C.E. &c, and he suggested several modifications which necessitated a redoing of all the field work and the entire design and estimating. Mr. Madeley's recommendations were accepted and the necessary preliminary investigation and the preparation of the detailed design were ordered to be carried out. This was completed by the end of Kanni 1104. A new division for carrying out the project was formed and an Engineer was deputed to inspect water works of importance in British India. Estimates were duly prepared and sanctioned in 1104 M.E. The work was put in operation and was under the guidance and control of the Chief Engineer till 3-12-1110 M. E. when it was separated and a new Department known as the Water Works Department was formed.
Details of the various schemes are given in the chapter on the Water Works and Drainage. The controlling staff of this department consists of a Water Works and Drainage Engineer, two Executive Engineers for Water-works and an Executive Engineer for Drainage besides Assistant and Sub-Engineers and Superintendents

  1. PIPE LINE TUNNEL FOR WATER


    Water Works and Drainage: A scheme to supply the town of Trivandrum with water was under consideration for over half a century, but Water Works and it was left to the year 1103 M.E. to witness the first beginnings of its realisation. In 1921 a report with estimate was prepared by the then Chief Engineer, Mr. F.J. Jacob, The scheme provided for the water supply from the Karamana river at Aruvikkara to a prospective population of 1,75,000 souls at the end of 1946, occupying an area of 18 square miles. The scheme was examined by Mr. J. W. Madeley, M.A., M.I.C.E. M.A, M. Soc., C.E. &c, and he suggested several modifications which necessitated a redoing of all the field work and the entire design and estimating. Mr. Madeley's recommendations were accepted and the necessary preliminary investigation and the preparation of the detailed design were ordered to be carried out. This was completed by the end of Kanni 1104. A new division for carrying out the project was formed and an Engineer was deputed to inspect water works of importance in British India. Estimates were duly prepared and sanctioned in 1104 M.E. The work was put in operation and was under the guidance and control of the Chief Engineer till 3-12-1110 M. E. when it was separated and a new Department known as the Water Works Department was formed.
    Details of the various schemes are given in the chapter on the Water Works and Drainage. The controlling staff of this department consists of a Water Works and Drainage Engineer, two Executive Engineers for Water-works and an Executive Engineer for Drainage besides Assistant and Sub-Engineers and Superintendents
  2. The Karamana rises in the vicinity of the Agasthiarkoodam about 1600 m above the sea level. The peaks of origin of the river are today known as Chemmunji Motta and Aathiramala and its upper tributary rivers are the Kaaviyaar, Attayaar, Vaiyappadyaar and Thodayaar. The river flows for 66 kilometers in a south - south west direction before flowing into the Arabian Sea.[3] The largest tributary of the Karamana is the Killiyar, which flows for a distance of 24 kilometres. It has five anicuts on it which regulates the flow of water. Part of the water is diverted into the Kochar channel which in turn feeds the Padmatheertham pond outside the Padmanabhaswamy Temple. There are several temples located along the Killiyar's banks, the most famous of which is the Attukal Temple.[4] The Killiyar drains the Nedumangad forest and its basin is rich in avian fauna. The river merges with the Arabian Sea through the Pozhikkara estuary. In its final lap, the river runs parallel to the sea and the river here is known as the Edayar.[1]